Category: MP3 Devices

Mobile Internet: The 2016 Road Warrior’s Guide to Choosing New Wheels


OK. We’re not going to bring Mobile Computing down to the teepee level, but we have decided to dedicate a column regularly to Mobile Internet developments in the marketplace. Of course, our major focus will remain the impact on unified communications and especially Asterisk®, FreeSWITCH™, PBX in a Flash™, and Incredible PBX™. The idea here is to document a design that lets road warriors travel with the same communications dexterity that they have at home or in the home office. In other words, our vision is a mobile computing environment that makes travel status transparent. Things that worked a certain way in the office should work similarly on the road or in the comfort of your Motel 6 suite. :-)

To get 2016 started on the right foot, we want to lay out some of the technology that’s available to the road warrior who spends a significant amount of time in an automobile. Our objective today is to help you choose that next set of wheels, the proverbial perfect vehicle. We began documenting some of what we’re looking for in our December Mobile Internet column. Today we’ll follow up with more details and some real-world feedback. What we’ll be covering in coming months applies equally to those that travel for pleasure as well as those that do it for a living. Unless you prefer hiding in your Man Cave, we hope you’ll find something useful that makes travel away from your home office amenities easier and less intimidating.

Let’s begin by documenting some of our inexpensive must-haves. These can round out your vehicle shopping list without much impact on the cost of a vehicle: cup holders (lots of them), cigarette lighter connections (lots of them), USB ports (lots of them), and compartments especially those with access to power or USB ports. Another must have for us was a fold down table for the back seat. These come standard in Mercedes S Class sedans as well as the Jaguar XJ. For other vehicles, you’ll need to consider aftermarket options which is a little surprising when you consider that every airline seat has had fold down tables FOREVER. In their haste to roll out the latest gee whiz features, many car manufacturers have forgotten the basic essentials that make all of this technology useful. But there’s hope. General Motors is among those that have finally awakened to the 21st century. Our best advice is this. Before you get swept away by the self-parking car, take a quick look inside the cabin and consider whether the vehicle has the road warrior essentials.

Now for the fun stuff. Take a quick look at this AutoBytel article which ticks off some of the more interesting high tech features that are available in the marketplace today: GPS-linked temperature control, a sensor that provides a text alert if someone is hiding in your car, a collection of audio and visual alerts if the car senses that you are distracted or falling asleep at the wheel, self-parking vehicles, night vision with pedestrian detection, adaptive cruise control that adjusts your speed based upon the speed of the vehicle in front of you, blind spot detection that provides visual warnings on your side view mirrors when a vehicle is cruising along beside you at 70+ mph, lane departure warnings which include console alerts, buzzing your seat, or adjusting your steering wheel to guide you back into your lane. And, last but not least, the latest Tesla which can drive itself under certain highway conditions. In case you haven’t guessed, none of this technology comes cheap. Typically, the features first appear in the high end cars and require the purchase of even higher priced, factory-installed options. Then they trickle down to less costly vehicles as the price of the technology drops.

Here’s our two cents worth of advice on some of these features. We happen to live in the southeastern United States so we really don’t need a GPS to tell us to turn on the air conditioner. Almost any road warrior’s dream machine will have automatic temperature control. That’s as much technology as you need to stay cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

A sensor to tell us someone is hiding inside our car is another clever idea, but we much prefer a vehicle that can lock itself when you leave the vehicle or when you place the vehicle in motion. Newer GM vehicles can also sound an alarm if someone sticks a hand into your window while you’re stopped at a traffic light. Works great unless people are passing you things while parked in a carpool line.

If you’re a road warrior that does a lot of night driving, all of the high tech features you can find that help you drive and stay awake at the wheel are terrific additions. Not mentioned in the AutoBytel article is one of our favorites that’s actually been around for decades. The head-up display (HUD) appears on the lower part of the driver’s windshield. It shows information such as your speed and the speed limit without taking your eyes off the road. For the science behind it, see this article.

If you’re a road warrior that spends considerable time commuting in heavy traffic or driving on interstates, adaptive cruise control is the best invention since sliced bread. It doesn’t completely drive the car for you, but it reduces your need to stay 99.9% focused on what’s in front of you every second of the trip. You simply set the separation distance between your vehicle and the vehicle in front of you, and radar in your vehicle does the rest, adjusting your speed to keep you at or below the cruise control speed you set for your vehicle while preserving the spacing you predefined. Newer versions of adaptive cruise control include support for bringing your vehicle to a complete stop at traffic signals. The best testimonial we can provide is this. Once you have a vehicle with adaptive cruise control, you’ll never buy another vehicle without it. It’s that good!

Blind spot detection is another radar-based feature. Visual side view mirror alerts are provided whenever something is hiding in your vehicle’s blind spot. Of course, you can accomplish much the same thing by adding supplemental wide-view (blindspot) mirrors to your existing side view mirrors at considerably less cost. However, the radar-enhanced version typically is bundled with features such as adaptive cruise control and lane departure alerts so there is no additional cost for the convenience. Just be sure to test them for accuracy before dispensing with turning your head to check for vehicles. We’ve actually had a vehicle in which the sensors were incorrectly positioned. Merging into traffic without any visual warning of what’s beside you is a quick ticket to the body shop, both for the car and for you.

Lane departure alerts and autocorrection are equally important for those that spend endless hours on long stretches of boring highway. The other essential ingredient for every road warrior is the smartphone app, Waze. Between hazard alerts, speed trap notifications, and directions, it’s the single-most important traveling enhancement that’s come along in a very long time. Think of it as you free copilot. It can watch for things up ahead and alert you to problems before you actually encounter them. Because its data is based upon real-time data and feedback from thousands of road warriors, it has no equal in terms of accuracy. See our first article in this series for more details.

Wireless charging is another feature that has been touted by many of the Android device manufacturers. In the case of Samsung, the technology was available in the Galaxy Note 4 except for the back cover which can be replaced easily. Surprisingly, Apple has completely ignored it thus far. There are, of course, aftermarket cases that will bring wireless charging to any smartphone including the iPhones. Beginning with some 2014 models, General Motors, Chrysler, and Toyota began integrating wireless charging stations into the center consoles of some of their vehicles. By 2017, most car manufacturers probably will support it either as an included or add-on accessory.

No review of automotive technology would be complete without mention of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, the two smartphone integration systems from America’s finest software development companies. One can only hope that the car manufacturers see the light and drop their insistence upon their own proprietary consoles. Both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto provide navigation, messaging, and numerous music platforms including Spotify, Pandora, Google Play Music, and Apple Music. Many newer vehicles offer one or the other, and some offer both. The systems also are available as aftermarket add-ons. For an excellent review of the two competing systems, take a look at this CNET review. Our only complaint with Apple CarPlay at the moment is the inability to add applications other than those that Apple has chosen for you. That means no Google Maps and no Waze, at least for now. For an excellent interview with the man behind both technologies at General Motors, see this article from The Verge.

So which vehicle did we choose for our Mobile Internet Lab? Well, come back next month and we’ll take you for a ride as we review the best WiFi Hotspots to complement that new set of wheels. We’ll consider offerings from Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon, and AT&T so there will be something for almost everybody with a smartphone.

Originally published: Monday, January 18, 2016





Need help with Asterisk? Visit the PBX in a Flash Forum.


 
Awesome Vitelity Special. Vitelity has generously offered a terrific discount for Nerd Vittles readers. You now can get an almost half-price DID from our special Vitelity sign-up link. If you’re seeking the best flexibility in choosing an area code and phone number plus the lowest entry level pricing plus high quality calls, then Vitelity is the hands-down winner. Vitelity provides Tier A DID inbound service in over 3,000 rate centers throughout the US and Canada. When you use our special link to sign up, Nerd Vittles gets a few shekels down the road to support our open source development efforts while you get an incredible signup deal as well. The going rate for Vitelity’s DID service is $7.95 a month which includes up to 4,000 incoming minutes on two simultaneous channels with terminations priced at 1.45¢ per minute. Not any more! For our users, here’s a deal you can’t (and shouldn’t) refuse! Sign up now, and you can purchase a Tier A DID with unlimited incoming calls and four simultaneous channels for just $3.99 a month. To check availability of local numbers and tiers of service from Vitelity, click here. NOTE: You can only use the Nerd Vittles sign-up link to order your DIDs, or you won’t get the special pricing! Vitelity’s rate is just 1.44¢ per minute for outbound calls in the U.S. There is a $35 prepay when you sign up. This covers future usage. Any balance is refundable if you decide to discontinue service with Vitelity.


Some Recent Nerd Vittles Articles of Interest…

Santa’s Technology Roundup: The Best Products of 2014 with Some Surprises

Once a year we like to pause and take a look back at 10 technology products that really grabbed our attention. 2014 will be remembered as a spectacular year. So here’s what made the Nerd Vittles short list for 2014…

Smartphone of the Year: It’s a 5-Way Tie

And the winners in no particular order… Galaxy Note 4, iPhone 6+, LG G3, HTC One M8, and Moto X.1 So which should you choose if you can only have one? Visit AndroidHeadlines.com for a detailed feature comparison. You can’t go wrong with any of them. In our family, there’s one of almost all of them.

Desktop Computer of the Year: Apple’s 27‑inch iMac with Retina 5K display

If you work with a computer for a living, there is no competition. It scales to any feature set you may need. Run, don’t walk, to your nearest Apple Store and get in line. We waited two months for ours!

Portable Computer of the Year: Apple’s MacBook Air with Retina Display

Hah. Just kidding. It would have been the hands-down favorite in 2014 except for one minor detail. It hasn’t been released… yet. If you absolutely have to have a retina display-quality notebook, then you’ll have to settle for the slightly thicker Macbook Pro this Christmas. For us, we’re waiting for 2015 and what will surely be the MacBook Air with Retina Display.

Tablet of the Year: iPad Air 2

If you’re starting to think we’re charter members of the Apple FanBoy Club, then you haven’t been following Nerd Vittles for very long. We can be one of their harshest critics. But the bottom line is that Apple products are compelling because of their tight integration to Apple’s closed society. If you’re a member of that club, then you’ll want the iPad Air 2 to add to your collection. It’s a terrific tablet at a compelling price.

Multimedia Device of the Year: Roku 3

If you’re into Netflix and Amazon Prime and movies, nobody needs to tell you that the streaming device hardware market is a crowded place. The Roku 3 isn’t the cheapest device in the market, but it’s still the one we always drop into our suitcase when we hit the road. It’s simple to configure and supports WiFi almost anywhere. It just works!

VoIP Product of the Year: Vitelity’s vMobile

It’s taken a few starts and stops to get the kinks out, but Vitelity’s vMobile smartphone is a truly revolutionary offering. It provides seamless integration of the smartphone into your PBX infrastructure. The phone becomes “just another extension” on your PBX except the device is 100% mobile which means it works with WiFi or it works anywhere Sprint has a tower. For any organization with staff that travels, this is a must-have device. Anything you can do with a traditional PBX extension, you can do with your smartphone using the vMobile technology. It’s the hands-down winner as VoIP Product of the Year. Use our special signup link and help support the Nerd Vittles, PBX in a Flash, and Incredible PBX projects.

VoIP SOHO Hardware of the Year: CuBox-i

We’ve tested lots of small footprint hardware in search of the perfect VOIP platform for the home or SOHO office. The search is over. The hands-down winner is the CuBox-i. It’s tiny, powerful, quiet, and has every feature you could possibly want in a VoIP server. Read our full review here. They’re 25% at NewEgg if you hurry.

VoIP Deal of the Year: $15 Pogoplug with Incredible PBX

If there’s one thing all of us have in common, it’s a burning desire to find the best bargain on the planet. In the VoIP marketplace, look no further than here. Repurposing a PogoPlug for less than $20 (and some of them went for $5), is the perfect way to learn about VoIP without breaking the bank. Our tutorial on the VoIP Deal of the Year will tell you everything you need to know to get started.

Must-Have Product of the Year: Amazon Echo

The Amazon Echo is still an invitation-only device, but you need to get in line NOW. During the introduction, Amazon is selling them for $99. Or you can get one on eBay for about triple that amount. It’s money well spent. Think of it as a desktop version of Siri. But it’s so much more. With Amazon Prime and Prime Music accounts plus a free iHeartRadio account, you get access to a collection of over a million songs just by saying the name of the artist or song or playlist or radio station of interest. You also can upload 250 of your own songs not purchased through Amazon Music at no charge. Or, for $25 a year, you can upload up to 250,000 tracks much like iTunes Match. The sound quality of the device is nothing short of spectacular. My teenage daughter and I spent over two hours playing with it the first night it arrived. And the excitement hasn’t waned. It’s the go-to device for all of our visitors to explore new and old music. And, yes, Amazon Echo knows the weather, the time, and just about anything else you care to ask about. You’ll have it in your living room in no time. Not only will it speak the results while playing your favorite song, it’ll send the results and to-do list to your smartphone.

2014: Cloud Computing Reinvented

Over the past few years, we’ve seen a gradual migration of server platforms to the cloud thanks in large part to ever falling prices on the Amazon EC2 platform. But 2014 saw some new cloud strategies. First came the pay-once-use-it-forever platform of CloudAtCost.com. Wait for the next sale and save half on almost any of their server platforms. If you follow us on Twitter, we’ll let you know when it happens. We’ve had several servers for almost a year with no hiccups. In fact, we now keep backup images of the Nerd Vittles, PBX in a Flash, and Incredible PBX web sites running 24/7 on these Canadian servers. Check out the performance for yourself.

Then there was Digital Ocean with its pay-by-the-hour pricing coupled with the ability to create virtual machines for almost any platform in under a minute. It truly is a developer’s dream come true. Frankly, it’s our platform of choice for development of all the great software you read about here. Use our signup link and get a $10 credit to try things out. The beauty of the technology is you can create a server with 512MB of RAM and a 20GB drive, work for a half a day, take a snapshot of your project, and then delete the server until you feel like working again. Total cost for use of the platform and storage of your snapshot: about 2¢.

With any great new technology, of course, competition is not far behind. Meet Vultr, the Digital Ocean knock-off promising more memory, more server locations, and more features for less money. Is Vultr really better? We’ll let you know after we’ve had more time to play. Our first look uncovered a few wrinkles. First, you had to request enabling of port 25 for outbound SMTP mail support. Not a big deal if it were documented that you had to request it, but it isn’t mentioned anywhere on the site. Second, virtual machines take a bit longer to create and much longer to become fully functional on Vultr. We got spoiled by the one-minute spin up at Digital Ocean. But, the good news is a penny-an-hour server gets you a gig of RAM, 20 gigs of storage, and 2 terabytes of data transfer a month for $7. And it is fast! So stay tuned for a full review and…

Merry Christmas!

Originally published: Monday, December 22, 2014



Need help with Asterisk? Visit the PBX in a Flash Forum.


 
Awesome Vitelity Special. Vitelity has generously offered a terrific discount for Nerd Vittles readers. You now can get an almost half-price DID from our special Vitelity sign-up link. If you’re seeking the best flexibility in choosing an area code and phone number plus the lowest entry level pricing plus high quality calls, then Vitelity is the hands-down winner. Vitelity provides Tier A DID inbound service in over 3,000 rate centers throughout the US and Canada. When you use our special link to sign up, Nerd Vittles gets a few shekels down the road to support our open source development efforts while you get an incredible signup deal as well. The going rate for Vitelity’s DID service is $7.95 a month which includes up to 4,000 incoming minutes on two simultaneous channels with terminations priced at 1.45¢ per minute. Not any more! For our users, here’s a deal you can’t (and shouldn’t) refuse! Sign up now, and you can purchase a Tier A DID with unlimited incoming calls and four simultaneous channels for just $3.99 a month. To check availability of local numbers and tiers of service from Vitelity, click here. NOTE: You can only use the Nerd Vittles sign-up link to order your DIDs, or you won’t get the special pricing! Vitelity’s rate is just 1.44¢ per minute for outbound calls in the U.S. There is a $35 prepay when you sign up. This covers future usage. Any balance is refundable if you decide to discontinue service with Vitelity.


Some Recent Nerd Vittles Articles of Interest…

  1. Some of our purchase links refer users to Amazon and other sites when we find their prices are competitive for the recommended products. Nerd Vittles receives a small referral fee from merchants to help cover the costs of our blog. We never recommend particular products solely to generate commissions. However, when pricing is comparable or availability is favorable, we support Amazon and other merchants because they support us. []

2013 Greatest Hits: Lenny Returns for an Encore Performance

Nothing in the VoIP community this year quite captured the hearts and minds of geeks around the world like Brian West’s “Lenny.” For anyone that’s ever been dogged by obnoxious telemarketers or that’s had to deal with less than lucid tech support inquiries, Lenny was a godsend. Finally, we all had a place to send those poor souls while getting our daily chuckle listening to the results. If you’re late to the party and missed all the fun, then start today by listening to some of the recordings posted on ItsLenny.com and Reddit. Our personal favorite has got to be the “security expert” explaining the discovery of a vulnerability in Lenny’s network:

0:00

As if Brian needed another feather in his cap after FreeSwitch™, what made Lenny an instant hit was the ability to reroute telemarketing and blacklisted callers directly to ItsLenny.com headquarters for processing. The site provided numerous local phone numbers around the world as well as a SIP URI. For those in the PBX in a Flash™ and FreePBX® community, it was especially easy because of the Lorne Gaetz Lenny Blacklist Mod. By simply entering the SIP URI of Lenny, all of your telemarketers were immediately rerouted to Lenny. And then one day, The Music Died.

What? No more Lenny? Were we all destined to return to the screaming monkeys?

Well, not so fast. We got in touch with Brian to inquire about Lenny’s health. Brian explained that he was seeking a more robust home for our pal because of the tremendous response and worldwide usage of the ItsLenny.com site.

Brian also graciously offered permission to use the Lenny recordings for those that wanted to host their own “Lenny” during the interim. And that brings us to today. We’re not sufficiently proficient in FreeSwitch to offer an interim solution on that platform. And, for our shortcomings, we apologize. But what we can do is provide an Asterisk® alternative that you can host on your own server until Lenny returns to his former glory in his new home.

Introducing Lenny Encore! We’ve actually got a number of new creations to introduce today. First, we’ll give you a short law school lesson on the do’s and don’ts of recording phone calls. Second, today’s Lenny Encore dialplan code introduces the Asterisk BackgroundDetect function which actually waits for someone to speak and then proceeds when silence ensues. It’s not perfect, but it helps with applications like this and for applications that seek to detect the presence of answering machines when making robocalls. Third, we’ll show you how to use the Lenny Blacklist Mod in FreePBX to redirect blacklisted callers to any extension you wish rather than merely playing a congestion or Zapateller Special Information Tone (SIT). Fourth, we’ll show you how to record calls in Asterisk with one line of dialplan code. Fifth, we’ll document for the first time how to create a button on almost any SIP phone to reroute ringing (unanswered) incoming calls to another extension. Sixth, we’ll review how to safely set up your own SIP URI and Free DID to enable Lenny Encore access from anywhere. And, finally, we’ll provide you some links to take Lenny Encore for a test drive before you install anything. Please don’t use these links as a destination for your blacklist. The links will only be available for a few weeks. Now let’s get started.

Law School 101: Recording Phone Calls. For openers, this is not legal advice! Consult your own attorney for that. This is merely background information to hopefully alert you to some of the pitfalls which await should you decide to start recording phone conversations. One of the first things you learn in law school is that there’s a difference of legal opinion on almost every topic. That’s why both sides pay lawyers which is a good thing… for lawyers. So it is with the law pertaining to the recording of phone calls. Let’s start with the ABC’s of phone recording. Whether you can legally record a phone call between you and someone else depends upon several things: (A) the location of the person making the call, (B) the location of the person receiving the call, and (C) how the call makes the journey from Point A to Point B.

In some jurisdictions, you probably can’t record a phone call at all because you can’t legally operate an Asterisk server. In other jurisdictions, you can record a call if you give yourself permission to record your conversations with others. In a few jurisdictions (including at least a dozen states in the United States), both parties have to consent before you can record a phone call. In some of those, providing an announcement that you’re recording the call will suffice while in others you have to explain why you’re recording the call and allow the caller to opt out. At least in the United States, if the call crosses state lines then federal law may control; however, there may also be federal agency rules and regulations that impose additional constraints on interstate calls. In law school, there’s a full-semester course devoted to Conflict of Laws. What you need to know is that normally (but not always) the law of the jurisdiction in which the call is initiated controls. Clear as mud? You bet. Here’s the state-by-state and country-by-country breakdown of the rules for those of you that are curious. The moral of this story should be clear:

UNLESS YOUR INITIALS ARE NSA, DON’T RECORD PHONE CALLS UNLESS YOU’VE CONSULTED A LAWYER AND CAREFULLY EXPLAINED WHO THE CALLING PARTIES WILL BE, WHAT YOU INTEND TO RECORD, WHERE EACH POTENTIAL CALLER WILL BE CALLING FROM, WHEN YOU WILL BE RECORDING THE CALLS, WHY YOU ARE DOING IT, AND HOW YOU WILL BE RECORDING THE CALLS. And this isn’t going too well for the NSA either!

6 P.M. UPDATE: A couple of serious bugs were discovered in the initial release. If you’ve already installed Lenny Remake, please replace the original dialplan code using the following commands. Skip this step if you have not previously installed Lenny Remake. The first-time install instructions below have been corrected to remove the problem. Our apologies.


cd /tmp
wget http://pbxinaflash.com/lsupport.tgz
tar zxvf lsupport.tgz
rm lsupport.tgz
sed -i '\:// BEGIN Lenny Remake:,\:// END Lenny Remake:d' /etc/asterisk/extensions_custom.conf
sed -i '/\[from-internal-custom\]/r /tmp/lenny.txt' /etc/asterisk/extensions_custom.conf
rm lenny.txt
rm 3.gsm
asterisk -rx "dialplan reload"
amportal a r

Installing Lenny Encore for the First Time. Now for the fun stuff. We’ve only tested this on PBX in a Flash servers running Asterisk 1.8 and Asterisk 11. For other platforms, there may be some prerequisites that you have to address. On the PIAF platform, log into your server as root. Then create and run a shell script that looks like this:

#!/bin/bash

mkdir /var/lib/asterisk/sounds/lenny
chown asterisk:asterisk /var/lib/asterisk/sounds/lenny
cd /var/lib/asterisk/sounds/lenny
wget http://pbxinaflash.com/Lenny.tgz
tar zxvf Lenny.tgz
rm Lenny.tgz

cd /tmp
wget http://pbxinaflash.com/lsupport.tgz
tar zxvf lsupport.tgz
rm lsupport.tgz
sed -i '\:// BEGIN Lenny Remake:,\:// END Lenny Remake:d' /etc/asterisk/extensions_custom.conf
sed -i '/\[from-internal-custom\]/r /tmp/lenny.txt' /etc/asterisk/extensions_custom.conf
rm lenny.txt
mv 3.gsm /var/lib/asterisk/sounds/lenny
cd /var/lib/asterisk/sounds/lenny
chown asterisk:asterisk *
chmod 755 *

echo " " >> /etc/asterisk/extensions_custom.conf
echo "[bridgit]" >> /etc/asterisk/extensions_custom.conf
echo "exten => 4,1,Pickup(701@from-internal)" >> /etc/asterisk/extensions_custom.conf
echo "exten => 4,2,Pickup(777@from-internal)" >> /etc/asterisk/extensions_custom.conf
echo " " >> /etc/asterisk/extensions_custom.conf

asterisk -rx "dialplan reload"
amportal a r

echo "Try it out by dialing 53669 from any extension on your PBX."

In the [bridgit] section of the code (at the bottom of the script), you’ll see two extensions in bold: 701 and 777. These represent a phone extension and ring group on your server that handle incoming calls from telemarketers. We’ll explain it in more detail shortly. For now, change the numbers to match your setup before you run the script. If you want to manage telemarketing calls from additional extensions with SIP phones, just add additional lines to the [bridgit] context incrementing the line numbers as you go, e.g. 4,3 then 4,4, etc.

Installing Lenny Blacklist MOD. To automatically reroute blacklisted callers to Lenny Encore, you’ll need to modify the blacklist processing setup in FreePBX. To do this, you first have to install the Lennny Blacklist MOD. Download it to your desktop from the Download Now link. Next, add it to FreePBX in the usual way: Admin -> Module Admin -> Upload Modules. Choose the Lenny Blacklist MOD on your Desktop. Once its imported, click on the Local Module Admin link to install and enable it. Once it’s enabled, open it under Other -> Lenny Blacklist MOD. Configure it to match what’s shown below:

Recording Calls with Lenny Encore. By default, Lenny Encore will do its thing with no call recording. If you and your lawyer think recording is a good idea, here’s how to enable it. Log in as root and edit extensions_custom.conf in /etc/asterisk. Simply uncomment the three lines near the top of the file that look like what’s shown below and reload your dialplan:


;exten => 53669,n,MixMonitor(/tmp/Lenny/${RECORDING}.wav)
;exten => 53669,n,NoOp(Recording will be available: /tmp/Lenny/${RECORDING}.wav)
;exten => 53669,n,Playback(en/this-call-may-be-monitored-or-recorded)

This gets the recordings saved to the /tmp/Lenny directory on your server, but these file collections can grow large. We recommend emailing them to yourself in MP3 format once a day and then deleting them. Here’s how to set this up:

cd /root
wget http://nerdvittles.com/convert2mp3.tar.gz
tar zxvf convert2mp3.tar.gz
nano -w convert2mp3.sh

When the editor opens, plug in your email address for delivery of the files and then save the modified script. Now add an entry to /etc/crontab that looks like this:

6 1 * * * root /root/convert2mp3.sh >/dev/null 2>&1

Reroute Ringing Calls to Lenny Encore. We’ve never seen this documented for Asterisk so here’s a bonus for this week. Have you ever wanted to reroute an incoming call to another extension while it was ringing so that you didn’t have to answer, tell the caller to hold, and transfer the call? Well we have, too. That’s especially true in the case of telemarketers and politicians.

As part of the Lenny Encore dialplan code, we’ve added the necessary piece to get this working on many SIP phones with a spare button that can be pressed to dial a number. Many phones call it a Speed Dial entry. Just create a Speed Dial entry for your phone that looks like this:

Now, when the CallerID shows an annoying caller is ringing, just press the Lenny key!

But suppose you want to make this more generic. If you’d like to be able to press the Lenny key and be prompted for the extension number to which to forward the incoming call, then edit the 536691 dialplan code (as we did with call recording) and uncomment the following lines:


;exten => 536691,n,Flite("After the beep, enter extension or press pound for Lenny.")
;exten => 536691,n,Read(SENDTO,beep,7)
;exten => 536691,n,GotoIf($["foo${SENDTO}" = "foo"]?5:6)

If you hit the Lenny key while an incoming call is ringing and enter an extension number followed by #, then that’s where the call will go. If you just hit #, then Lenny Encore gets the call.

Taking Lenny Encore for a Test Drive. We’ve set up a temporary site to let you try Lenny out before installing on your own server. Just call 1-206-424-6913 or use either of the following SIP URIs: 2233435945@sip2sip.info or lenny@nerdvittles.com. Our next article shows you how to do it yourself!

Upgrading Lenny Encore. This project is still a work in progress. What that means is the code is changing almost daily. You can replace your setup with the latest code by following the 6 p.m. update procedure documented above. This will reset your system to NO RECORDINGS in addition to loading the latest dial plan code. Your feedback is, of course, always appreciated. Come join the fun!

More Lenny Encore to Come! Well, that’s enough to keep you busy this week. Next week (now available!), we’ll walk you through setting up a safe SIP URI and free DID to handle inbound calls for Lenny or any other purpose on your PBX in a Flash server.


Deals of the Week. There are a few amazing deals still on the street, but you’d better hurry. First, for new customers, Sangoma is offering a board of your choice from a very impressive list at 75% off. For details, see this thread on the PIAF Forum. Second, a new company called Copy.com is offering 20GB of free cloud storage with no restrictions on file size uploads (which are all too common with other free offers). Copy.com has free sync apps for Windows, Macs, and Linux systems. To take advantage of the offer, just click on our referral link here. We get 5GB of extra storage, too, which will help avoid another PIAF Forum disaster. Finally, O’Reilly has over 1,000 Packt Ebooks on sale for 50% off until August 15. Only 3 days left!

Originally published: Monday, August 12, 2013




Need help with Asterisk? Visit the PBX in a Flash Forum.


 

Don’t miss the first-ever FreePBX World on August 27-28 at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas. For complete details, see this post on the FreePBX blog.


 

We are pleased to once again be able to offer Nerd Vittles’ readers a 20% discount on registration to attend this year’s 10th Anniversary AstriCon in Atlanta. Here’s the Nerd Vittles Discount Code: AC13NERD.


 
Awesome Vitelity Special. Vitelity has generously offered a terrific discount for Nerd Vittles readers. You now can get an almost half-price DID from our special Vitelity sign-up link. If you’re seeking the best flexibility in choosing an area code and phone number plus the lowest entry level pricing plus high quality calls, then Vitelity is the hands-down winner. Vitelity provides Tier A DID inbound service in over 3,000 rate centers throughout the US and Canada. When you use our special link to sign up, Nerd Vittles gets a few shekels down the road to support our open source development efforts while you get an incredible signup deal as well. The going rate for Vitelity’s DID service is $7.95 a month which includes up to 4,000 incoming minutes on two simultaneous channels with terminations priced at 1.45¢ per minute. Not any more! For our users, here’s a deal you can’t (and shouldn’t) refuse! Sign up now, and you can purchase a Tier A DID with unlimited incoming calls and four simultaneous channels for just $3.99 a month. To check availability of local numbers and tiers of service from Vitelity, click here. NOTE: You can only use the Nerd Vittles sign-up link to order your DIDs, or you won’t get the special pricing! Vitelity’s rate is just 1.44¢ per minute for outbound calls in the U.S. There is a $35 prepay when you sign up. This covers future usage. Any balance is refundable if you decide to discontinue service with Vitelity.


Some Recent Nerd Vittles Articles of Interest…

11/11/11: To Celebrate Nerd New Year’s, Please Welcome…

Nerd Vittles Daily Dump

Just click on the image above to visit the site. Content is updated at least twice daily. As always, we welcome your content suggestions. Enjoy!

Originally published: Friday, November 11, 2011


Great News! Google Plus is available to everyone. Sign up here and circle us. Click these links to view the Asterisk feed or PBX in a Flash feed on Google+.




Need help with Asterisk? Visit the PBX in a Flash Forum.
Or Try the New, Free PBX in a Flash Conference Bridge.


whos.amung.us If you’re wondering what your fellow man is reading on Nerd Vittles these days, wonder no more. Visit our new whos.amung.us statistical web site and check out what’s happening. It’s a terrific resource both for us and for you.


 
Awesome Vitelity Special. Vitelity has generously offered a terrific discount for Nerd Vittles readers. You now can get an almost half-price DID from our special Vitelity sign-up link. If you’re seeking the best flexibility in choosing an area code and phone number plus the lowest entry level pricing plus high quality calls, then Vitelity is the hands-down winner. Vitelity provides Tier A DID inbound service in over 3,000 rate centers throughout the US and Canada. When you use our special link to sign up, Nerd Vittles gets a few shekels down the road to support our open source development efforts while you get an incredible signup deal as well. The going rate for Vitelity’s DID service is $7.95 a month which includes up to 4,000 incoming minutes on two simultaneous channels with terminations priced at 1.45¢ per minute. Not any more! For our users, here’s a deal you can’t (and shouldn’t) refuse! Sign up now, and you can purchase a Tier A DID with unlimited incoming calls and four simultaneous channels for just $3.99 a month. To check availability of local numbers and tiers of service from Vitelity, click here. NOTE: You can only use the Nerd Vittles sign-up link to order your DIDs, or you won’t get the special pricing! Vitelity’s rate is just 1.44¢ per minute for outbound calls in the U.S. There is a $35 prepay when you sign up. This covers future usage. Any balance is refundable if you decide to discontinue service with Vitelity.


Some Recent Nerd Vittles Articles of Interest…

7 Steps to Skytopia: Pain-Free Calls with Skype and Asterisk

As you probably know, Digium® announced that Skype for Asterisk® would not be available for sale or activation after July 26, 2011. Here we are in November. So what to do? If you're looking for a commercial solution, you're S.O.L. But, if you have a non-commercial PBX for personal use1, then keep reading. We'll walk you through, step-by-step, getting Skype integrated into your PBX in a Flash or Incredible PBX environment. It's easy, but it's a manual process. If you follow the steps below in order, you'll be up and running in about 15 minutes.

Prerequisites. For today's project, we're assuming you have an existing Incredible PBX server running CentOS 5.7. If not, here's our tutorial to get you up and running quickly. You'll also need a keyboard, mouse, and monitor. We strongly recommend a dedicated server such as an Atom-based PC. If you're using a virtual machine, then you'll need a sound card alternative. Try this: /sbin/modprobe snd-dummy.

UPDATE: We've revised this article a bit to accommodate PIAF2 with CentOS 6.2 and Incredible PBX 3. Keep in mind that Skype is a 32-bit application so we strongly recommend a 32-bit platform if reliability matters to you.

Step 1. For inbound Skype calling to work with other implementations including generic PBX in a Flash systems, you'll need to create a SIP URI for your Asterisk server: mothership@127.0.0.1. You do NOT need to expose the SIP port(s) of your Asterisk server to the Internet, and we strongly recommend that you don't! We've previously explained how to set up a SIP URI in this article. The Incredible PBX includes this SIP URI functionality out of the box.

Step 2. You'll also need Java 1.5. To see if it's included in your distribution, issue the following command: rpm -q jdk. If your particular Asterisk distribution doesn't have JAVA 1.5 or higher installed (rpm -q jdk), here's how to do it. Go to the Oracle Technology Network, sign up for a free Oracle web account and log in. While still logged in, accept the binary code license agreement, and click on this link to download jdk-6u12-linux-i586-rpm.bin. Then copy the file to /root on your Asterisk server. Make the file executable (chmod +x jdk-6u12-linux-i586-rpm.bin) and then run it. Scroll down the wordy license agreement AGAIN and type yes. Java 1.6 then will be installed on your system. Whew!

Step 3. You'll also obviously need a dedicated Skype account for your Asterisk server. If you don't have one to spare, download the Skype software for your Mac or Windows PC, and sign up for a free account. You can try out your account by calling our demo hotline: nerdvittles. Get this working on your Mac or PC before proceeding! Then be sure you log out and disable automatic logins on reboot, or you'll have a problem down the road with two machines trying to log in to a single Skype account.

Step 4. Now we're ready to install the remaining software components that your server will need to access Skype. Log into your Asterisk server as root and issue the following commands.

cd /root
mkdir skype
cd skype
wget http://download.skype.com/linux/skype_static-2.1.0.47.tar.bz2
tar jxvf skype_static*
yum -y install xorg-x11-server-Xvfb
yum -y install qt4
yum -y install xterm
yum -y install libXScrnSaver.i386 < == use this for CentOS 5.x
#yum -y install libXScrnSaver <== use this for CentOS 6.x
wget http://incrediblepbx.com/siptosis.tgz
cd ..
wget http://incrediblepbx.com/skype-start
chmod +x skype-start
cp skype-start skype/.
cd /
tar zxvf /root/skype/siptosis.tgz
cd /root/skype

If you'd prefer to avoid all the typing, you can issue the following commands to download a script that will do all the heavy lifting for you. This is for CentOS 5.x systems only:

cd /root
wget http://incrediblepbx.com/skype-setup
chmod +x skype-setup
./skype-setup

For PIAF2 systems running CentOS 6.x, use this instead:

cd /root
wget http://incrediblepbx.com/skype-setup2
chmod +x skype-setup2
./skype-setup2

Step 5. Now there are a few steps to manually configure the software components so that the entire Skype startup process can be automated when your server boots in the future. To begin, you'll need to fire up X-Windows which puts your server in graphics mode. This is the only mode that Skype understands. While logged into your server as root, issue the following command: xinit

NOTE: If xinit won't start on your particular machine, you may need to create /etc/X11/xorg.conf. Here's a generic config file that should work fine for CentOS 5.x systems:

Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "X.org Configured"
Screen 0 "Screen0" 0 0
EndSection

Section "Device"
Identifier "Card0"
Driver "vesa"
EndSection

Section "Screen"
Identifier "Screen0"
Device "Card0"
SubSection "Display"
Viewport 0 0
Depth 16
Modes "800x600"
EndSubSection
SubSection "Display"
Viewport 0 0
Depth 16
Modes "800x600"
EndSubSection
EndSection

For PIAF2 users, some have reported issues on Atom machines with seeing a display at all after xinit loads. If this happens to you, don't panic. Simply log into your server from a PC or MAC using SSH. Then run: vncserver :1. Set a password for VNC, and then use a VNC client on your PC or Mac to access VNC at the IP address of your server on display port 1. Now you can continue with Step 6, below.

Step 6. Now we're ready to start up Skype, and get it properly configured. There are two important requirements. First, we want to make sure your credentials are saved for automatic login in the future. And second, we want to configure Skype to run in a minimized state each time it restarts. To begin, click in the white graphics window on your screen using your mouse and issue these commands:

cd /root/skype/skype_static-2.1.0.47
./skype

Click on the Accept button to accept the Skype license agreement. Once Skype loads, enter your Skype Name and Password. Before clicking on Sign In, be sure to check the Automatic Sign In box so that you'll be logged in automatically in the future. Once you're logged in, click on the blue S in the lower left corner of the window to access the Skype Main Menu. Then click Options. When the General tab displays, check the box which says Start Skype minimised in the system tray. Then click the Apply button. To test things out, click on the Sound Device tab and then Make a Test Call. Once you're sure everything is working, click the Close button. Now click on the blue S again and click Quit to shut down Skype.

Step 7. Now we're ready to integrate Skype into the SipToSis middleware so that Asterisk can communicate with Skype. Issue the following commands to start Skype in background mode and then start SipToSis. Be sure to write down the PID for Skype in case we need to kill the app if something goes wrong.

./skype &
cd /siptosis
./SipToSis_linux

A message from Skype will pop up asking if you want to authorize external use of Skype. Before clicking Yes, be sure to click the Checkbox to Remember This Selection for future connections! When you click Yes, you'll see the SipToSis CLI indicating that it's waiting for a Skype call.

If you've installed this on an Incredible PBX, Skype should now be functional. From another Skype account, just call the Skype Name that you used to set this up, and your Asterisk extensions should start ringing. To test outbound Skype calling, use an X-Lite softphone connected to an extension on your Asterisk server and dial *echo123 to access Skype's call testing service or *nerdvittles to access our demo.

All that remains is to configure your server to automatically start Skype and SipToSis whenever your system is restarted. Here's how. Press Ctrl-Alt-F2 to get a new login prompt on your server. Log in as root and issue the following command:

echo "/root/skype-start" >> /etc/rc.d/rc.local

Now reboot your server and make sure everything is working.

Navigation Tips. Here are a few navigation tips for managing your Asterisk console on CentOS systems once Skype has been installed:

1. Ctrl-Alt-F2 gets you a new login prompt for your server

2. Ctrl-Alt-F7 gets you back to the SipToSis/Skype session. You can kill SipToSis by holding down Ctrl-C for several seconds. To find the Skype PID: pidof skype. To kill Skype: kill pid#. To restart Skype: skype & and to restart SipToSis, just issue the command again: ./SipToSis_Linux

3. Ctrl-Alt-F9 gets you to the Asterisk CLI.

Setting Up Speed Dials for Skype Friends. One of the wrinkles with Skype is that Skype uses names for its users rather than numbers. If you don't have a SIP URI-capable softphone, there's still an easy way to place calls to your Skype friends using FreePBX®. Just add a Speed Dial number to your FreePBX dialplan. Choose Extension, then select the Custom type, provide an Extension Number which is the Speed Dial number (this could actually spell your friend's name using a TouchTone phone), enter a Display Name for your friend, and add an optional SIP Alias. Then insert the following in the dial field replacing joeschmo with your friend's actual Skype name. Save your entries and reload the dialplan when prompted.
SIP/joeschmo@127.0.0.1:5070

Security Warning. One final note of caution. Do NOT expose UDP port 5070 to the Internet unless you first secure this port with a username and password to avoid Internet intruders using your gateway as a free Skype dialing platform! You do not need 5070 exposed to the Internet to implement today's gateway solution for inbound or outbound Skype calling from your Asterisk server so we recommend you keep it securely behind at least a hardware-based firewall.

FreePBX Design. For those not using Incredible PBX, here is the FreePBX setup that Incredible PBX uses and that we recommend. For outbound Skype calls, you have two choices.

1. To place a call to a regular phone number using SkypeOut (which costs you money), you'll simply dial 8 plus the area code and number. Our foreign friends will have to adjust their dialplans and /siptosis/SkypeOutDialingRules.props accordingly. Today's setup assumes 10-digit phone numbers!

2. To place a call to a Skype username using a softphone that supports SIP URI dialing such as X-Lite, you simply precede the Skype username with an asterisk, e.g. *echo123 will connect you to the Skype Call Testing Service or *nerdvittles will connect you to the Nerd Vittles Skype demo.

For incoming Skype calls, the default setup routes those calls to a SIP URI: mothership@127.0.0.1. Whether you point this URI to an extension, ring group, or IVR is up to you. In the default Incredible PBX build, the mothership URI is pointed to the Stealth AutoAttendant, an IVR that plays a welcoming message and then transfers the call to a ring group if no digit is pressed by the caller.

Configuring FreePBX. To put this setup in place, use a web browser to access FreePBX on your Asterisk server. You'll need to create a Custom Trunk and then an Outbound Route.

1. Choose Setup, Add Trunk, Add Custom Trunk. Fill in the form so that it looks like the following using your own CallerID number obviously:

When you're finished, click the Submit Changes button and then reload the dialplan when prompted.

2. Next choose Setup, Outbound Routes, Add Route. Fill in the form so that it looks like this:

When you're finished, click the Submit Changes button. Be sure to move this new OutSkype route to the top position in your Outbound Routes listing in the right margin! Then reload the dialplan when prompted.

3. If you're not using Incredible PBX, add a new DayNight Control 1 option while you're still in FreePBX. Just specify where you want calls routed for Day mode and Night mode. Then, here's the easy way to activate SIP URI support on your Asterisk/FreePBX server. Copy the [from-sip-external] context from the extensions.conf file in /etc/asterisk. Now copy the content into extensions_override_freepbx.conf. Be sure to preserve the context name in brackets! On a FreePBX 2.8 system, make it look like the following. The additions we're making are shown in bold below:

[from-sip-external]
;give external sip users congestion and hangup
; Yes. This is _really_ meant to be _. - I know asterisk whinges about it, but
; I do know what I'm doing. This is correct.
exten => _.,1,NoOp(Received incoming SIP connection from unknown peer to ${EXTEN})
exten => _.,n,Set(DID=${IF($["${EXTEN:1:2}"=""]?s:${EXTEN})})
exten => _.,n,Goto(s,1)
exten => s,1,GotoIf($["${ALLOW_SIP_ANON}"="yes"]?from-trunk,${DID},1)
exten => mothership,1,Goto(app-daynight,1,1)
exten => s,n,Set(TIMEOUT(absolute)=15)
exten => s,n,Answer
exten => s,n,Wait(2)
exten => s,n,Playback(ss-noservice)
exten => s,n,Playtones(congestion)
exten => s,n,Congestion(5)
exten => h,1,NoOp(Hangup)
exten => i,1,NoOp(Invalid)
exten => t,1,NoOp(Timeout)

Finally, reload your Asterisk dialplan, and we're finished with Asterisk and FreePBX setup:

asterisk -rx "dialplan reload"

Fedora Builds. For those using recent Fedora builds, these systems have a full implementation of X-Windows and KDE. Just start the system in mode5 (graphics mode), log in, run Skype in one window and start up SipToSis in a terminal window using the commands in Step 7 above. Authorize external use of Skype when prompted.

Where To Go From Here. Well, those are the basics. You now can make one outbound Skype call at a time from your Asterisk server, and you can receive an inbound Skype call on any Asterisk extension when Skype users call your regular Skype name. If you want multiple Skype account support, then you'll need to do some tweaking. What you'll need is the STS Trunk Builder toolkit which is free, but proprietary. Enjoy!

Originally published: Tuesday, November 1, 2011


Great News! Google Plus is available to everyone. Sign up here and circle us. Click these links to view the Asterisk feed or PBX in a Flash feed on Google+.




Need help with Asterisk? Visit the PBX in a Flash Forum.
Or Try the New, Free PBX in a Flash Conference Bridge.


whos.amung.us If you're wondering what your fellow man is reading on Nerd Vittles these days, wonder no more. Visit our new whos.amung.us statistical web site and check out what's happening. It's a terrific resource both for us and for you.


 
Awesome Vitelity Special. Vitelity has generously offered a terrific discount for Nerd Vittles readers. You now can get an almost half-price DID from our special Vitelity sign-up link. If you're seeking the best flexibility in choosing an area code and phone number plus the lowest entry level pricing plus high quality calls, then Vitelity is the hands-down winner. Vitelity provides Tier A DID inbound service in over 3,000 rate centers throughout the US and Canada. When you use our special link to sign up, Nerd Vittles gets a few shekels down the road to support our open source development efforts while you get an incredible signup deal as well. The going rate for Vitelity's DID service is $7.95 a month which includes up to 4,000 incoming minutes on two simultaneous channels with terminations priced at 1.45¢ per minute. Not any more! For our users, here's a deal you can't (and shouldn't) refuse! Sign up now, and you can purchase a Tier A DID with unlimited incoming calls and four simultaneous channels for just $3.99 a month. To check availability of local numbers and tiers of service from Vitelity, click here. NOTE: You can only use the Nerd Vittles sign-up link to order your DIDs, or you won't get the special pricing! Vitelity's rate is just 1.44¢ per minute for outbound calls in the U.S. There is a $35 prepay when you sign up. This covers future usage. Any balance is refundable if you decide to discontinue service with Vitelity.


Some Recent Nerd Vittles Articles of Interest...

  1. Excerpt from the Skype Terms of Service: "Subscriptions are for individual use only. Each subscription is to be used by one person only and is not to be shared with any other user (whether via a PBX, call centre, computer or any other means). Each subscription is to be used for your own personal communication purposes only, to make calls to another individual. The use of the subscription for commercial gain, such as calling numbers specifically to generate income for yourself or others by placing such calls, is not permitted. Unusual call patterns may be considered indicative of such use and may result in us terminating your subscription and blocking your User Account in accordance with paragraph 11.2." []

Android 3 Deal of the Year: Acer Tab for Under $300

We’ve never done back-to-back reviews of similar devices, but this week’s Target ad changes all of that. As you might expect, Acer has covered all of the bases with their entry into the dual-core Android 3 tablet sweepstakes. You may recall that we weren’t huge fans of the Motorola Xoom which promised a lot and delivered a boatload of vaporware. The Acer Iconia Tab A500 is not the Xoom. You not only get a microSD slot and Flash that actually work, but Acer has thrown in an HDMI port that can output 1080p video as well as a USB port that lets you connect your favorite USB devices including external hard disks. It performs this magic with an 8-10 hour battery life. And this week (only at Target) you can pick up this WiFi-only device for half the cost of the Motorola Xoom. In fact, after the gift card, it’s only a dollar more than the single-core Vizio Tablet that we reviewed last week.

Update: See the comments for equivalent deals just announced at NewEgg and CompUSA.

It’s difficult to describe the feel of the Acer Tab. Suffice it to say, it’s dimensions coupled with its sleek and sculpted design put it in the league with the iPad2 unlike the Xoom which felt chunky and clunky despite being an ounce lighter than the Acer.

As we mentioned last week, we don’t dive too deeply into the technical weeds in our reviews. If you want the technical assessment, check out this PC World review. What we prefer to evaluate is real-world usage of these devices. The Acer Tab has stunning performance. In addition to reading email and browsing the web, here’s the suite of applications which we think matter to most folks. We want to watch videos from YouTube and NetFlix. We want to stream music from Google Music and Spotify and read our Kindle books. We like to use Skype. And, yes, we also like Flash video support which works perfectly on the Acer tablet.

In addition to running Android 3, the Acer Tab boasts impressive hardware specs running a 1GHz Nvidia Tegra 250 dual-core processor with 1GB of RAM and 16GB of ROM. Add another 32GB easily with the microSD slot. The 10.1-inch tablet has a 1280-by-800 pixel display with a 16:10 aspect ratio that’s perfect for HD video content. We always prefer testing devices with real-world video content that we’ve shot so we can compare it to performance on other devices. Our Pawleys Island Parade video didn’t disappoint. It’s performance and color were as good or better on the Acer Tab than on Apple’s top-of-the-line 27″ iMac featuring a quad-core 2.93 GHz Core i7 processor with 8GB of RAM plus L2 and L3 cache. The same can be said with playback of complex Flash video. Netflix unfortunately is still a few weeks off although rooted Acer devices reportedly run it just fine.

On the music front, it doesn’t get much better than the Acer Tab. With Google Music or Spotify, the music world is your oyster. And the silver lining is that the Acer Tab is the one and only device that includes Dolby Mobile audio. Once you adjust the equalizer to match your taste in music, you’ll have sound quality to match that 20-pound boombox gathering dust in your basement.

In the communications department, Skype performed well although video calls are not yet supported. That’s unfortunate given the impressive specs on the Acer Tab’s two cameras. The Iconia Tab has a 5-megapixel rear-facing camera with flash in addition to a 2-megapixel front-facing camera for video conferencing. Finally, making and receiving free phone calls using either an Asterisk® server with CSipSimple or Google Voice using a $50 Obihai device and the free ObiON client for Android both worked great.

There’s only one word you’ll need to remember to take advantage of this Target deal: H-U-R-R-Y! This is a one-week only special, and Target offers no rainschecks. So call around until you find one. You won’t be sorry. And, as usual, Target offers a 90-day, no questions asked return policy which is second to none.

Google+ Invites Still Available. Need a Google+ invite? Drop us a note and include the word “Google+” and we’ll get one off to you. Come join the fun!

Our Favorite Android Apps. We’ve listed a few of our favorite apps below for those just getting started with Android. Enjoy!


Originally published: Tuesday, August 16, 2011




Need help with Asterisk? Visit the PBX in a Flash Forum.
Or Try the New, Free PBX in a Flash Conference Bridge.


whos.amung.us If you’re wondering what your fellow man is reading on Nerd Vittles these days, wonder no more. Visit our new whos.amung.us statistical web site and check out what’s happening. It’s a terrific resource both for us and for you.


 
Awesome Vitelity Special. Vitelity has generously offered a terrific discount for Nerd Vittles readers. You now can get an almost half-price DID from our special Vitelity sign-up link. If you’re seeking the best flexibility in choosing an area code and phone number plus the lowest entry level pricing plus high quality calls, then Vitelity is the hands-down winner. Vitelity provides Tier A DID inbound service in over 3,000 rate centers throughout the US and Canada. When you use our special link to sign up, Nerd Vittles gets a few shekels down the road to support our open source development efforts while you get an incredible signup deal as well. The going rate for Vitelity’s DID service is $7.95 a month which includes up to 4,000 incoming minutes on two simultaneous channels with terminations priced at 1.45¢ per minute. Not any more! For our users, here’s a deal you can’t (and shouldn’t) refuse! Sign up now, and you can purchase a Tier A DID with unlimited incoming calls and four simultaneous channels for just $3.99 a month. To check availability of local numbers and tiers of service from Vitelity, click here. NOTE: You can only use the Nerd Vittles sign-up link to order your DIDs, or you won’t get the special pricing! Vitelity’s rate is just 1.44¢ per minute for outbound calls in the U.S. There is a $35 prepay when you sign up. This covers future usage. Any balance is refundable if you decide to discontinue service with Vitelity.


Some Recent Nerd Vittles Articles of Interest…